Interview with Sr Judith in Refugee Camp for South Sudanese in Northern Uganda
Nor Madit breast feeds her twin children in a camp for displaced people in Melijo, South Sudan, near that country's border with Uganda. Families here fled fighting around Bor, in Jonglei State, in December 2013, but have not been warmly welcomed to this region of Eastern Equatoria State, where two earlier waves of displaced people in the 1980s and 1990s have left relations tense between the newcomers, who are Dinka, and the largely Ma'adi residents around the city of Nimule. The ACT Alliance is helping the displaced families and the host communities affected by their presence, and is supporting efforts to reconcile the two groups.

Interview with Sr Judith in Refugee Camp for South Sudanese in Northern Uganda

Sr Judith works in a refugee camp in Northern Uganda where thousands of Southern Sudanese fleeing the civil war in their country have sought refuge. She helps them work though…

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At Loreto School South Sudanese Pupils from Diverse Tribes Learn to Live in Peace
Sister Rosa Le Thi Bong, a Vietnamese member of Sisters of Our Lady of the Missions, walks with refugee children in the Makpandu refugee camp, a ramshackle collection of huts with mud walls and thatched roofs spread through a remote section of forest 40 kilometers from Yambio, the capital of Western Equatoria State in the newly independent South Sudan. More than 3,000 people live in the camp, having fled the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2008 when the Lord's Resistance Army started a murderous rampage through the area. In recent months the Congolese have been experiencing harassment and insults from the local population. Religious workers say the refugees want to go home to the Congo, but not until Joseph Kony and the LRA are removed. Sister Rosa works in the camp as a member of Solidarity with South Sudan, a pastoral and teaching presence of Catholic priests, sisters and brothers from around the world.

At Loreto School South Sudanese Pupils from Diverse Tribes Learn to Live in Peace

In a country wracked by civil war and ethnic strife, Irish nuns have created a unique space where young women can dream of a better future and begin to acquire…

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Bishop Taban Award
Bishop ParideTaban

Bishop Taban Award

“I am infinitely grateful for this honourable distinction in which Archbishop Justin Welby of Canterbury has elevated and spotted light at the end of tunnel in the person of Bishop…

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Pope Francis postpones visit to South Sudan

VATICAN CITY MAY 30, 2017 (CISA) – Pope Francis’ desired trip to South Sudan for an ecumenical visit alongside Anglican Archbishop Justin Welby, won’t be happening this year, Vatican spokesman, Greg Burke has confirmed. The trip is still being considered, just, “Not this year,” Burke told journalists today. He did not elaborate on when the visit, which had been tentatively planned for October, might take place. Pope Francis had hoped to travel to South Sudan to promote peace, after making a similar effort during his 2015 visit to the Central African Republic. The Pope previously voiced his intention to visit South Sudan alongside Anglican Primate and Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby. The trip would have marked the first time Catholic and Anglican leaders made such a trip together. According to the Catholic Register, the idea was likely the fruit of a meeting the Pope had with ecumenical leaders from South Sudan last fall, when Archbishop Paulino Luduku Loro of Juba traveled to Rome together with Rev. Daniel Deng Bul Yak, Archbishop of the Province of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan, and Rev. Peter Gai Lual Marrow, Moderator of the Presbyterian Church of South Sudan. The three of them met with Pope Francis October 27, 2016, to discuss the situation of the country with Pope Francis. During the visit, they not only highlighted their joint collaboration in seeking to alleviate the effects of the crisis, but they also invited the Pope for a formal visit. Arranged by Ghanaian Cardinal Peter Turkson, President of the Vatican’s dicastery for Integral Human Development, the meeting focused largely on current tensions dividing Sudanese people, and the collaboration of different Christian denominations in promoting reconciliation and the common good. South Sudan became an independent country in 2011, but has been torn by a civil war since December 2013, between the state forces – the Sudan People’s Liberation Army – and opposition forces, as well as sectarian conflict. A peace agreement was eventually signed, but was broken by violence in the summer of 2016, prompting the South Sudan Council of Churches to publicly condemn the violence and pray for peace. A ceasefire was then ordered by President Kiir and then-Vice President Machar in July.

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