General Superior

Rev. Fr. Michael Corcoran is 55, is Irish,  and was born and baptised on  7th March 1960 in Kilkenny, Ireland. He responded to a missionary call and went to our MHM minor seminary St. Joseph’s College, Freshford , Ireland (1973 to 1978) .   This was followed by major missionary formation in Roosendaal, the Netherlands, and then in St Joseph’s College, Mill Hill, London, where he made his Perpetual Missionary Commitment on 29th  January 1985 and was subsequently ordained priest 18th August 1985 in Galmoy, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, and was appointed to Soroti, Diocese. Uganda. He continued to serve in East Aftrica in the following years, including being Vocations Director and Regional, and was  elected to the General Council in 2005, with special responsibility for our missions in Africa. Having completed his five year term, he was later  elected MHM Regional in Ireland and President of the Irish Missionary Union  which he is still at the time of his election as General Superior of our Society.

He was elected 12th General Superior of the Mill Hill Missionaries on Monday 15th June 2015.

 

 

 

 

To Mill Hill Students in Cameroon: Travelling companions  – what does that mean?

To use a phrase from Pope Francis, all of us are called to wake up the world. How do we do this?

By living and communicating the message of Jesus Christ. Our Missionary way of life is part of that communication of the Word, of how our humanity was saved through God’s loving action and how the way we live our humanity must reflect the loving kindness of God. Our life is missionary and our formation should not be oriented only towards personal growth but also how we are to care for God’s people. Hopefully our formation is not only to produce administrators or managers but people who are brothers and sisters and – ‘travelling companions’.

Travelling companions  – what does that mean? We missionaries are called to a prophetic  life. We must more than ever speak to people through our lives – called to be prophets by demonstrating how Jesus lived on earth. We are called to light the way to the future and walk with others on that way. Our Missionary life is not an end in itself, but a service to God’s people on their journey.

I have written this in my messages in our Central Newsletters that waking up the world is not making news headlines – it always involves encounter and personal contact. It is about being alongside the men and women of our times in their own struggles in life and especially those who are on the periphery of society. As I said yesterday that periphery does not always refer to geographical or economic peripheries of Society – though this is also vital – but of the profound peripheries of alienation and hopelessness and suffering and search for meaning that exists among the men and women of our time. We are to be travelling companions who journey with others step by step in their search, not lecturers or moralisers who simply tell other people where they should be.

Missionary life is not just about doing things. It is about doing things in a different way. It is about witness and attraction. We must never tire of this. We are called to live life authentically in whatever circumstances we find ourselves in – our life is a never –ending challenge irrespective of increased age or numbers.

vital thing that we missionaries can do is pray- not just pray for someone but show what prayer means in a world where doing and having possessions seem to be the sole order of the day. Your life of prayer is also a prophecy. It is witnessing to the mystery of God’s presence among us. It is witnessing to the fact that God cares, that God loves, that God reaches out to us, even if his ways are mysterious. We have to learn to share our prayer life with others and guide people in prayer. This cannot be privatised. Your prayer is a service for the whole church and cannot be enclosed within the walls of your chapel.

Wake up the world – Pope Francis has a great gift of characteristically simple and striking language. His language is earthy: it is not earthy for our entertainment, but it is profoundly provocative and challenging. Perhaps my favourite comment of Pope Francis in his meeting with religious superiors, was when he said: our life is not a bottle of distilled water. Again what does this mean?

It means that we do not need a missionary life that is crystal clear, tasteless, insipid and safe. Our Missionary way of life must make noise, uproar and even a mess.

They are the Pope’s words and I like them. Noise and uproar and and making a mess were and in some cases still  not on high on the instruction list of Formators. Those in formation were taught not to stand out, formed in conformity. Our charism as missionaries is not one of conformity. It is like yeast which even when you are not aware is always causing ferment and changing and developing. This is what the prophecy of missionary life is like. That is what the great missionaries were always like.

God called each one of us by name and still challenges us by name to respond and to find in our commitment to Jesus the fullness of our humanity. We need renewal in the Church. The Church will never renew by looking inwards. We can never be just and inward looking Society preoccupied by our own challenges. The moment we become over concerned with our inward challenges the more we will actually become more inward looking and never the out going reflection of the challenging and prophetic message of Jesus who cares.

Let us become more travelling companions seeking to live our Christian life more authentically and with renewed enthusiasm. May the Lord be our travelling companion and our guide as we reflect on the word and break the bread of communion.

Amare et Servire.

Student Liturgy
Bamenda, Cameroon
21st January 2017

 

Summer 2017: Message from the General Superior

Ours is an age of grave global problems and issues. We live in a time in which polarization and exclusion are considered the only ways to resolve conflicts. We see, for example, how quickly those among us with the status of a stranger, an immigrant, or a refugee, become a threat, take on the status of an enemy. An enemy because they come from a distant country or have different customs. An enemy because of the colour of their skin, their language or their social class. An enemy because they think differently or even have a different faith. An enemy because…. And without realizing it, this way of thinking becomes part of the way we live and act. Little by little, our differences turn into symptoms of hostility, threats and violence. The recent attacks in Manchester and London demonstrate the virus of polarization and animosity that permeates our way of thinking, feeling and acting.

The call to mission in our own times is as urgent as ever. In his message for World Mission Sunday 2017, Pope Francis reminds us all that the world vitally needs the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Through the Church, Christ continues his mission as the Good Samaritan, caring for the bleeding wounds of humanity, and as the Good Shepherd, constantly seeking out those who wander along winding paths that lead nowhere.

The Church’s mission is enlivened by a spirituality of constant exodus. We are challenged “to go forth from our comfort zone in order to reach all the peripheries in need of the light of the Gospel” (EG 20). The Church’s mission impels us to undertake a constant pilgrimage across the various deserts of life, through the different experiences of hunger and thirst for truth and justice. The Church’s mission inspires a sense of constant exile.

The Gospel is Good News filled with contagious joy, for it contains and offers new life. It is important to ask ourselves certain questions about our Christian and Mission identity and our responsibility as believers and missionaries in a world marked by confusion, disappointment and frustration, and torn by numerous wars that unjustly target the innocent. What is the basis of our Mission? What is the heart of our Mission? What are the essential approaches we need to take in carrying out Mission?

On my recent visitations to Malaysia and Kenya, it was brought home to me once again that our Mill Hill Missionaries of today come from distant lands where we have a rich legacy spanning well over a century; we have different traditions, skin colour, languages and social backgrounds; we think differently and we celebrate our faith in a variety of ways – this is one of our greatest riches and worthy of celebration.

With this abundant background mix and in light of new pastoral urgencies and new forms of poverty, we are called to deepen our charism and renew our impetus for evangelization. Called to be actively present in new arenas of evangelization with openness and attentiveness to situations of particular need that are emblematic of our time.

Michael Corcoran MHM

General Superior